While nearing the end of our Australian expedition together, we decided to make a trip to Melbourne and discover what this infamous city in Victoria, Australia had to offer.  

On the outskirts of Melbourne lies Dendy Street Beach in Brighton - known for it's numerous colorful "bathing boxes" lining the shore.  Obviously a little photo fun was about to go down!  

We hope you enjoy these playful boxes as much as we did.  (As well as the numerous tourists laughing along with us as we changed pose after pose in front of every single box!)

 

 

A little history for you:

The first of these iconic bathing boxes was built in 1862 and, by the turn of the century, many more were built as their popularity increased when sea bathing was promoted as a health benefit.

Originally boxes were built close to the water’s edge – as decency required almost direct entry into the water – to avoid bathers being seen in swimming costumes, even though these were all encompassing.

Numbering more than 200 in 1930 many were lost due to neglect and storm damage. When beach reconstruction was carried out and the bluestone walls were built, some boxes were relocated.

After many boxes were wrecked in the violent storm of 1934, those remaining were re-aligned in their present position, well above the high water mark.

Most boxes were painted green, grey or other dull colours, but after the Second World War many licensees decided to individualise their boxes with bright colours and designs.

During the 1970s the State Government attempted to have all the boxes demolished and cleared away. Council, the Bathing Box Association, Brighton Historical Society and residents combined to oppose this threat to Brighton’s heritage and were eventually so successful that the boxes are now protected by a Planning Scheme Heritage Overlay.

The 82* boxes remaining are a favourite subject of photographers and artists, especially when viewed from Green Point with the Melbourne skyline in the background – a vista that has appeared in many tourist publications.

*Umm... Actually we counted 90 boxes in total!

 

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